Help & Support

University of California at Davis Veterinary Students (530)752-3602 or toll free (800)565-1526 Monday-Friday 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm (PT) http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/petloss/index.htm Florida Community Volunteers (352)392-4700 Dial 1 and 4080 (352)392-4700 X4744 (Joy Diaz) Monday-Friday 7 pm to 9 pm (ET) http://www.vetmed.ufl.edu/vmth/companions.htm Michigan State University Veterinary Students
(517)432-2696 Tuesday to Thursday 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM (ET) http://cvm.msu.edu/petloss/index.htm Chicago VMA Veterinarians and Staffs (630)325-1600 Leave Voicemail

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The Next Step

How do I tell my family? Family members usually are already aware of a pet’s problems. However, you should review with them the information you have received from your veterinarian. Long-term medical care can be a burden that you and your family may be unable to bear emotionally or financially, and this should be discussed openly and honestly. Encourage family members to express their thoughts and feelings. Even if you have reached a decision, it is important that family members, […]

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The Decision

How Do I Make The Decision? Your relationship with your pet is special, and you are responsible for its care and welfare. Eventually, many owners are faced with making life or death decisions for their pets. Such a decision may become necessary for the welfare of the animal and for you and your family.  A decision concerning euthanasia may be one of the most difficult decisions you will ever make regarding your pet. Your decision is a personal one, but […]

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Travel by Car

If your pet is not accustomed to car travel, take it for a few short rides before your trip. Cats should be confined to a cage or crate to allow them to feel secure and to avoid having a pet under your feet while driving. Stick to your regular feeding routine and give the main meal at the end of the day or when you reach your destination.

Feeding dry food will be more convenient, assuming your pet readily consumes it. Dispose of unused canned food unless it can be refrigerated.

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Travel by Airplane

Air travel is of most concern to pet owners. You can minimize the chances of an unpleasant experience by following a few guidelines. Federal regulations require that pets be at least 8 weeks old and weaned at least 5 days before flying. Generally, a health certificate (which is not more than 10 days old) must be available before pets will be permitted to fly. A valid rabies vaccination certificate will also be required.  Contact the airline well in advance for […]

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Planning and Preparation

Planning and preparation are necessary when traveling with family pets. Consider whether your pet is comfortable when traveling. Some animals, like some people, function better in familiar surroundings. A car-sick animal can make a trip miserable for everyone. Some ill or physically impaired dogs and cats cannot withstand the rigors of travel. If this is the case, discuss options such as using a reliable pet-sitter or a clean, well-managed boarding facility with your veterinarian. If you will be staying with […]

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First Aid

Of course, before an emergency ever arises, it’s a good idea to learn all you can about first aid techniques and pet health care. Never leave dangerous objects like pins, needles, or fish hooks within reach. Keep poisonous products and materials far from your pet’s reach as you would with a child.  Be well aware of your pet’s normal behavior, so you can recognize what’s not normal. Remember that the objective is to relieve suffering . . . perhaps even […]

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